Mark Twain

"Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things that you didn't do than by the ones you did do ...
Explore. Dream. Discover." Mark Twain

Saturday, April 14, 2012

M is for Mom


Mom has been an important part of my life for as long as I can remember. In my early years she was my protector and guide. In the last 5 1/2 years she has lived with me in my home and I was her protector. In December 2011, however, she moved from my home into Assisted Living. It was a jarring and painful change for both of us.

But life moves on. We both adjusted.

The mother-child relationship can be a fluid one with many twists and turns. Initially the mothering parent (male or female) is the critical link that keeps an infant alive and safe. Later that role expands - helping the developing child, teen and young adult to fit successfully and purposefully into the society they inhabit. Even at end of life, the mother has a role to play - sharing and educating her children to the rewards and struggles at the conclusion of a long life.

These last lessons are sometimes missed or discounted. What can a senior citizen, an elderly mother or father teach you?

Plenty.

But these lessons are there to absorb if you keep your eyes and ears (and your heart) open.

Thanks, Mom.

10 comments:

  1. They can teach you plenty. You are getting a first hand look at your future...take notes.

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  2. I loved this and like the alphabet post idea, loved your knitting, weaving post too. Plus, since I am into "loving and liking", I am going to make a "walk meter" . . . for me. One more, The King is priceless! I have visted you before, had you saved in my iPad but had not followed. I am signed on now . . . I like your gentleness . . .

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  3. I like she was your protector and then you became hers. So sweet. :)

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  4. Couldn't let this one slip by.

    Mothers literally take care of a child for 18 years of their lives; not to mention the 9mo. before coming into the world; making sure they are feed, dressed and have a roof over their heads- not to mention all those years of teaching , admonishing, encouraging, and just being there!

    I've had my days with my mom were we disagreed and didn't really get along so well,but the one thing that always comes to mind is the 18 years that she cared for me and literally showed me all those acts of love for 18 years.

    She's, 82 years of age, in excellent health and never ceases to amaze me with her wisdom.
    I look at my mom in amazement and know that she did something right in life; and she did for 18 years- and she's still there for me.

    Mothers are priceless - its the children that sometimes need to look back and be reminded of that.


    http://bettyalark.blogspot.com

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  5. I've seen several Mom posts today. Good for all of you! :)

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  6. Cherish every moment you have with you Mom, good times and bad. I lost my Mom 13 years ago. I miss her every day.

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  7. I agree that it's so important to let our mom's know how much they can still teach us. Thanks so much for your kind words today. Let me know if you ever want to compare notes. I hope your mom is doing well, and is adjusting to her new life. Julie

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  8. Hi Elaine .. mothers still keep on being mothers .. My mother had a very difficult moment for both of us - when she realised she could no longer look after me, due to her ongoing incapacity .. it brings tears to my eyes .. but she continues on occasions to thank me - ie show her appreciation without overdoing it - but reminding me that even bedridden you can set examples to others and your children ..

    Important lesson for us all - I'm glad things are settling down for you .. cheers Hilary

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  9. That was a beautiful tribute to your mom. I have to remind myself everyday what our responsibilities in this phase of our lives. My kids and grands are learning how to be loving adults and I pray I can stay that way til the end. blessings to you and your mom.
    QMM

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